Ideas For Africa

Ideas for Africa is a project of the Free Society Institute, aiming to spread secular ideas, scientific thinking and skeptical inquiry in Africa through books.

On a continent where children are still persecuted for the ‘crime’ of witchcraft, and where democracy is still a new concept, we need to turn to the tools of reason.

Books are a fantastic way to spread ideas, as they can ignite a flame of inquiry in the minds they touch. So how do we ensure these ideas spread as far and fast as possible? By making the books spread as far and fast as possible!

Each book released by Ideas for Africa is given away freely, with only one condition: that the recipient pass it on to someone else when they are finished reading it. Each recipient receives the book under this same condition.

If there’s a particular book you’ve been wanting to read, please contact us and we’ll do our best to get it to you!

You can now donate via PayPal and EFT. Donate now!

If you would like to donate a book, please contact us.

Books of Ideas For Africa

The Believing Brain

The Believing Brain

The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies – How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths authored by Michael Shermer. Synthesizing thirty years of research, psychologist and science historian Michael Shermer upends the traditional thinking about how humans form beliefs about the world. Simply put, beliefs come first and explanations for beliefs follow. The brain, Shermer argues, is a belief engine. Using sensory data that flow in through the senses, the brain naturally begins to look for and find patterns, and then infuses those patterns with meaning, forming beliefs. Once beliefs are formed the brain begins to look for and find confirmatory evidence in support of those beliefs, accelerating the process of reinforcing them, and round and round the process goes in a positive-feedback loop.

In The Believing Brain, Shermer provides countless real-world examples of how this process operates, from politics, economics, and religion to conspiracy theories, the supernatural, and the paranormal. And ultimately, he demonstrates why science is the best tool ever devised to determine whether or not our beliefs match reality.

The Demon-Haunted World

The Demon-Haunted World

The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark is a book by astrophysicist Carl Sagan, which was first published in 1995.
The book is intended to explain the scientific method to laypeople, and to encourage people to learn critical or skeptical thinking. It explains methods to help distinguish between ideas that are considered valid science, and ideas that can be considered pseudoscience. Sagan states that when new ideas are offered for consideration, they should be tested by means of skeptical thinking, and should stand up to rigorous questioning.

The Magic of Reality

The Magic of Reality

The Magic of Reality: How We Know What’s Really True is a 2011 book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, with illustrations by Dave McKean. It is a graphic science book aimed primarily at children and young adults. Most chapters begin with quick retellings of historical creation myths that emerged as attempts to explain the origin of particular observed phenomena. These myths are chosen from all across the world including Babylonian, Judeochristian, Aztec, Maori, Ancient Egyptian, Aboriginal, Nordic, Hellenic, Chinese, Japanese, and other traditions.

Bad Science

Bad Science

Bad Science is a book by Ben Goldacre, criticising mainstream media reporting on health and science issues. Published by Fourth Estate in September 2008, the book contains extended and revised versions of many of his Guardian columns. It has been positively reviewed by the British Medical Journal and the Daily Telegraph[3] and has reached the Top 10 bestseller list for Amazon Books. It was shortlisted for the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize.

A Universe from Nothing

A Universe from Nothing

A Universe from Nothing: Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing is a book by physicist Lawrence M. Krauss first published in 2012, with an afterword by Richard Dawkins. Christopher Hitchens had agreed to write a foreword for the book prior to his death but was too ill to complete it. To write the book, Krauss expanded material from a popular lecture on the cosmological implications of a flat expanding universe he gave to the Richard Dawkins Foundation at the 2009 Atheist Alliance International conference. The book appeared on The New York Times bestseller list on January 29.

Breaking the Spell

Breaking the Spell

Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon is a 2006 book by the American philosopher and cognitive scientist, Daniel Dennett, which argues for a scientific analysis of religion in order to predict the future of this phenomenon. Dennett implies that the spell he hopes to break is not religious belief itself, but the conviction that religion is off-limits to scientific inquiry.

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values

The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values is a book by Sam Harris. In it, he promotes a science of morality and argues that many thinkers have long confused the relationship between morality, facts, and science. He aims to carve a third path between secularists who say morality is subjective (e.g. moral relativists), and religionists who say that morality is given by God and scripture. Harris contends that the only moral framework worth talking about is one where “morally good” things pertain to increases in the “well-being of conscious creatures”. He then argues that, problems with philosophy of science and reason in general notwithstanding, ‘moral questions’ will have objectively right and wrong answers which are grounded in empirical facts about what causes people to flourish.

Climbing Mount Improbable

Climbing Mount Improbable

Climbing Mount Improbable is a 1996 popular science book by Richard Dawkins. The book is about probability and how it applies to the theory of evolution, and is designed to debunk claims by creationists about the probability of naturalistic mechanisms like natural selection.
The main metaphorical treatment is of a geographical landscape, upon which evolution can only ascend in a gradual way, not being able to climb cliffs (this is known as an adaptive landscape). In the book Dawkins gives ideas about a seemingly complex mechanism coming about from many gradual steps that were previously unseen.

The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution

The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution is a 2009 book by British biologist Richard Dawkins, which was released on 3 September 2009 in the UK and on 22 September 2009 in the U.S. It sets out the evidence for biological evolution, and is Dawkins’s 10th book, following his bestselling critique of religion The God Delusion (2006) and The Ancestor’s Tale (2004), which traced human ancestry back to the dawn of life.

All images and book descriptions from Wikipedia.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s